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Every ten years or so, our local city government, the City Council and some folks in the Planning Department, get the notion that the downtown civic area needs to be revitalized.  So Master Plans are created, consultants are hired, public meeting are held and more often than not, the public has clearly expressed the desire […]

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  Just off a bit from the main downtown area of Wichita Falls, Texas is the world’s smallest skyscraper.  The Newby-McMahon Building was built in 1919 and its diminutive size is the outcome of a fraudulent investment scheme following a 1918 oil boom.   The building’s owner, Augustus Newby, solicited investors to get in quick […]

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On the heels of the last post, I thought I might say something about another great Western road, one that well pre-dates Route 66 – the Santa Fe Trail. For as challenging as it can be to find vestiges of Route 66, ferreting out the path of the old Santa Fe trail or the Oregon […]

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  I have written in the past about a journey down some portions of the old Route 66 that traverses the U.S. West from St. Louis to L.A.  And my last few posts have been about a trip to Texas that I took the opportunity on my return to travel a few more miles on […]

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Last week I took a slight detour during a Texas roadtrip to stop by one of the greatest buildings of the twentieth century, Louis Kahn’s Kimbell Art Museum in Ft. Worth.  What can you say about the Kimbell that hasn’t already been said, what superlatives can you you drum up to describe a building so […]

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On the heels of a post about the amazing masonry of the Mullen Building, designed by Temple Hoyne Buell in 1933, I discovered an even more spectacular brick building that takes masonry construction and design to places I have never quite seen before.  The Bryant Webster Elementary School in Denver’s North Highlands neighborhood was designed […]

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“Quoins” are the exposed stone pieces that you sometimes see stacking up only on the corner of a building. They sometimes look like a zipper applied to the corner edges of a structure.  And their use today is odd and usually fake and is trying to allude to traditional masonry construction and presumably the sense […]

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One of Denver’s sort of hidden architectural gems is the Mullen Building, part of the Saint Joseph hospital complex. Built in 1933, the Mullen Building was designed as a nursing school and dormitory by Denver architect Temple Hoyne Buell.  Buell was from Chicago and like so many Coloradans, came out West for the treatment of […]

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