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A few days ago a friend and I happened along this beautiful stone church in Hygiene, Colorado. This is about as simple as a building can be – a single, simple gabled building, about twice as long as it is wide.  And, about as tall as it is wide. It is the Church of the […]

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Each year Colorado Preservation Inc identifies a number of interesting and threatened buildings across the state. This year, prominent on the list, was a collective entry – the older advertising signs along Denver’s Colfax Avenue. I have been making images of these signs for years, so I decided to re-post this blog entry of mine from some time ago:

Colfax Avenue runs east-west through Denver, Colorado and is an approximately 26 mile journey from the eastern plains through the heart of the city westward to the base of the mountains.  Starting out as US Highway 40, it was the main entry into Denver from the east until the interstate highway system displaced its welcoming role.  The vestiges of that motor age are still evident in the aging signs that dot its length.  Once known as the “wickedest street in America”, Colfax is pretty tame these days as the muffler shops and fast-food outlets slowly displace the decaying motor inns and diners, vice and violence.

Starting from the eastern edge, you can get ready for your trip to the West by dressing the part

share save 120 16 Colfax Avenue, signs of western journey
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As Chair of Boulder’s Landmarks Board, I have been heading up an effort to engender greater appreciation and recognition of some of Boulder’s remarkable 1960′s architecture. Boulder really flowered in this decade as a number of new, high tech industries moved to town and the overall prosperity lead to a explosive building boom.  On the […]

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I am giving a public talk on February 19th on a brief history of Modern Architecture in Boulder at the public library Canyon Theater.  I have given a version of this talk in the past, with emphasis on preservation of the recent past.  This time around I have rewritten the focus of the talk to […]

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I grew up in Louisville, Kentucky and attended suburban Mayme S.  Waggener High School.  I have written previous posts about Hyper-Attenuated Building Syndrome, and it only recently occurred to me that this building is in fact a prime example.  Its plan proportions are something like 12:1 – a long, lean, learning machine. What I remember […]

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San Francisco is built on hills – very steep hills.  And, its street layout is basically a traditional grid overlaid on this topography.  This makes for a lot of very crazy inclines for both streets and buildings.  For residential properties, this most often means steps up to the front door.  Many, many steps.   So […]

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  As I have probably spoken about in previous posts, we draw no real distinction between architecture and interiors.  They are all a part of crafting a series of spaces that are made of various materials that make up a building.  To that extent, we spend as much time, and often considerably more, choosing interior […]

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